Exporting from the US to the UAE

US-UAE Trade Promotion And Compliance Portal

Resources for New U.S. Exporters

 

 

vFirst Time Exporter?  

Consider the following U.S. Government tools to help first time exporters, as well as exporters considering expanding to a new market like the UAE.

 

The U.S. Commercial Service web site contains helpful

resources for new exporters.  The USCS is the trade promotion

arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce, and helps U.S.

companies get started in exporting or in increasing existing

export sales to new markets.  Services include: 

 

  • Trade Counseling to provide them with the information they need to navigate the export process from beginning to end
  • Market intelligence to help U.S. exporters target the right market (s) for their products and services
  • Business Matchmaking services to connect them with the right partners and prospects
  • Trade Advocacy for U.S. companies to level the international playing field for international procurement

 

 

 

Export.gov is the U.S. Government’s export promotion web site, bringing together a number of resources from multiple agencies to assist exporters in promoting their products abroad.  Services include:

 

vCustomized Market Research and Due Diligence on potential markets and business partners overseas

vAdvertising and Promotional Events to introduce international buyers to your products

vPublications to assist with market research and other export considerations

vTrade Counseling to assist in navigating the export process

vBusiness Matchmaking services to connect exporters with the right partners and prospects

 

 

vCommercial Considerations For Doing Business in the UAE

 

 

Economic Overview

Economic Indicators & Statistics

Doing Business in The UAE – An Overview

 

vMajor Growth Sectors

 

 

Transportation Infrastructure Goods and Services

Aerospace

National Security/Defense

Information Technology

Energy: Oil, Gas, & Petrochemical

Energy: Alternatives and Renewables

Research and Education, Including Higher Education

Banking and Finance

Media Production

Health Care

Tourism and Hospitality

Environmental Technology and Services

Agricultural Products

Theme Parks and Entertainment


 


 

U.S. Export Regulatory Compliance

 

 

vExport Controls

U.S. export controls apply to a wide variety of goods, software, and technology (whether commercial/dual-use or defense-related).

 

These laws can control a wide variety of activities, including 

 

wShipments from one country to another;

 

wTransfers of technology or software between citizens of different countries – even if the transfer takes place electronically or within the same country; and

 

wThe provision of services to persons in different countries.

 

For more information, refer to the resources listed at the right.

 


U.S. Export Controls

vThe U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) administers the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), which cover exports and re-exports of commercial, dual use items.

ØSummary of Export Administration Regulations

ØGo to Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security for more information on the EAR

 

 

 

vThe U.S. Department of State Directorate of Defense Trade Controls administers the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), which cover exports and re-exports of military and dual use items. 

ØSummary of International Traffic in Arms Regulations

ØGo to Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls for more information on the ITAR.

 

vNuclear Export Controls

The United States regulates the export of civil nuclear reactors, as well as related equipment, technology, training, technical assistance and services to foreign persons, whether located in or outside the United States. 

 

In addition to the Commerce and State Department regulations described above, which may apply to some aspects of nuclear power projects, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy also regulate this activity. 

 

Careful planning is required as the United States nuclear export control regime is complex and the regulations do not establish clear lines among the various agencies’ jurisdictions over certain items.   

 

For more information on economic sanctions and embargoes, please refer to the resources listed at the right.

 

 

Nuclear Equipment/Nuclear Fuel Cycle

vThe U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates the import and export of nuclear equipment (e.g., nuclear reactor components) as well as nuclear material (e.g., source and byproduct material).  The equipment covered is that which relates to the nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle facilities.  The “balance of plant” (e.g., equipment and components for a nuclear power plant other than that relating to the reactor/fuel cycle facilities) are governed by the Commerce Department Bureau of Industry and Security’s dual-use export controls described above. 

ØSummary of NRC nuclear export controls

ØGo to Nuclear Regulatory Commission web site for more information on NRC controls.

Nuclear Technology and Related Services

vThe U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration regulations impose restrictions on U.S. persons that engage in the production of special nuclear material outside the United States.  DOE interprets this regulatory jurisdiction to cover the transfer of technology and services relating to nuclear reactors and certain nuclear fuel cycle facilities.  This jurisdiction covers activities conducted abroad by U.S. persons or by licensees, contractors or subsidiaries under the direction, responsibility or control of U.S. persons. This includes providing assistance to civilian nuclear reactors outside the United States. 

ØSummary of DOE nuclear export controls

ØGo to DOE NNSA web site for more information on DOE’s nuclear export controls.

 

vEconomic Sanctions and Embargoes

 

The U.S. maintains trade embargoes and economic sanctions against certain countries, entities and persons to implement UN security council resolutions as well as U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives.  U.S. sanctions laws may restrict a wide variety of activities, including –

 

wAny dealings, including contracts with certain prohibited individuals, companies, or governments;

 

wThe provision of goods, services, or technology to prohibited parties; and

 

wFacilitating transactions with prohibited parties.

 

For more information on economic sanctions and embargoes, please refer to Summary of OFAC trade embargoes and economic sanctions and the other resources listed at the right.

 

 

U.S. ECONOMIC SANCTIONS AND EMBARGOES

vU.S. embargoes and economic sanctions against foreign countries and nationals are administered by the Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). 

ØSummary of OFAC trade embargoes and economic sanctions

ØGo to Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control for more information on OFAC embargoes and sanctions programs.